Derek Carle

Reason To Believe
Comstock Records
E mail fara@comstock-records.com

Derek Carle, from the highlands of northern Scotland made the trip to Nashville to record this album with Comstock's producer Patty Parker, exactly 10 years after they recorded his first single together on Comstock. The first half of this new album contains all country songs, while the second half of the album contains covers of some of Derek's favourite songs from the 60's and 70's, though not always country


Derek get's the album off to a lively start with a great rocker, "Show Me What You Know About Love." This is a very catchy song, written by Paul Gibson, that is sure to get the feet tapping and the dancers on the floor.

The tempo slows for "Let's Be Old Fashioned" a nice love ballad about wanting to be old fashioned by making a home and settling down together.
How times have changed!

Another nice ballad is "Your Daddy Would Be Proud," another song from the pen of Paul Gibson. The song tells of a son playing and singing to his mother, the songs his late father used to sing.

Staying in a relaxed mood, Derek turns in an excellent cover of the Jim Webb classic that was such a big hit for Glen Campbell in the 60s. "By The Time I Get To Phoenix" has been recorded by many people since and this version certainly stands up with the best of them.

After a relaxing 9 minutes, Derek turns the heat up again with a song that is sure to be a favourite in all the best linedancing clubs. "Are You Ready To Rock" is a very catchy tune that has hit stamped all over it and, I believe, would make a good single release.

Closing the country half of this album is "Give Your Love To Me," a country love ballad from the pen of Michael Duncan Ray.

The second half of the album has Derek turning in some very fine covers of songs like, Cole Porter's "I've Got You Under My Skin," "She's Not There," a hit for the Zombies in the 60s, The Animals, "We've Gotta Get Outa This Place" also a big hit in the pop charts in the 60s.

Who can forget the Hollies classic, "He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother," a song covered since by just about everybody, and the albums closer Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Love Changes Everything."

Also on this second half of the album is a fine version of Lee Greenwood's "The Wind Beneath My Wings," written of course by Larry Henley and Jeff Silbar.


This is a very good album of Country & 60s music from Derek, a fine singer who does great justice to all of the songs on here. If you grew up as a pop loving teenager in the 60s like I did, and moved into country music as you got older, then this album is definitely for you.

I have no hesitation in recommending this album very highly.